Memory Boosting Superfoods That Fight Alzheimer’s

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Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks like thinking, reasoning, perception or communication. They might have difficulties with language,concentrating, planning or organising, orientation,visuospatial skills, difficulty ineating or walking without help.

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In order to get enough of these brain boosters, you’ll want to make sure your loved one stocks up on these foods:

1. Vegetables br

specially leafy greens like spinach, kale, turnip greens and cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, which have been strongly linked to lower levels of cognitive decline in older age, according to a study in the Annals of Neurology.

2. Berries and dark-skinned fruits: 3

Berries and dark-skinned fruits which are rich in antioxidants. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, some of the fruits that pack the most punch are blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, raspberries, plums, oranges, red grapes and cherries.

3. Salmon and other cold-water fish: 

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Salmon and other cold-water fish, such as halibut, tuna, mackerel and sardines, which are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Other omega-3 sources include beans, some nuts, flax seeds and healthy oils, like olive oil.

4. Turmeric

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Break out the curry! A host of studies have shown that turmeric, the spice used in curries, and its main active component curcumin, can help prevent Alzheimer’s. In one such study, researchers from UCLA found that vitamin D3, taken with curcumin, may help the immune system to get rid of the amino acids that form the plaque in the brain that’s associated with Alzheimer’s Disease. So the next time you cook, incorporate this healthy spice.

5. Chocolate

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If you haven’t already switched from milk chocolate to dark, now you have one more reason to. Compelling research already shows that dark chocolate, which contains flavonoids (a plant compound that helps with the body’s circulation), can help combat heart disease, but flavonoids may also help slow down the effects of dementia. In an Italian study, older adults who had mild symptoms of dementia drank cocoa with high, medium and low amounts of flavonoids. Those who consumed high amounts outperformed those who consumed low doses on cognitive tests. And a study is currently underway by the National Institute on Aging to see whether resveratrol, a compound found in chocolate, red wine, and grapes, can prevent dementia. One tip: A healthy choice is dark chocolate that has a 70% or higher cocoa content.

6. Coffee

Regular consumption of coffee may enhance memory and mental alertness and slow brain aging. Drinking 2-4 cups daily has proven benefits.

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7. Extra virgin olive oil :

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Extra virgin olive oil contains a substance called oleocanthal that helps boost the production of key proteins and enzymes that help break down the amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

8. Cold-pressed virgin coconut oil

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is a heart-healthy oil that is free of cholesterol and trans-fats, and boosts ketones. Coconut oil has been shown to improve the body’s use of insulin, increase HDL (good cholesterol), boost thyroid function and acting as an antioxidant and natural antibiotic.

9. Beans and legumes

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These foods contain more folate, iron, magensium and potassium that can help with general body function and neuron firing. They also contain choline, a B vitamin that boosts acetylcholine (a neuro transmitter critical for brain function

Sources:

Desilets AR, et al. Role of huperzine a in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Ann Pharmacother. 2009 Mar;43(3):514-8.

Clarke R, et al. Folate, vitamin B12, and serum total homocysteine levels in confirmed Alzheimer disease. Arch Neurol. 1998 Nov;55(11):1449-55.

Lourida I, et al. Mediterranean diet, cognitive function, and dementia: a systematic review. Epidemiology. 2013 Jul;24(4):479-89.

Gu Y, et al. Food combination and Alzheimer disease risk: a protective diet. Arch Neurol. 2010 Jun;67(6):699-706.

Mangialasche F, et al. High plasma levels of vitamin E forms and reduced Alzheimer’s disease risk in advanced age. J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;20(4):1029-37.

Mandel SA, et al. Understanding the Broad-Spectrum Neuroprotective Action Profile of Green Tea Polyphenols in Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases. J Alzheimers Dis. 2011;25(2):187-208.

Cardoso BR. Importance and management of micronutrient deficiencies in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:531-42.

Scarmeas N, et al. Physical activity, diet, and risk of Alzheimer disease. JAMA. 2009 Aug 12;302(6):627-37.6. Unlisted. Citicoline. Alt Med Rev. 2008;13(1):50-7.

Pettegrew JW, et al. Clinical and neurochemical effects of acetyl-L-carnitine in Alzheimer’s disease. Neurobiol Aging. 1995 Jan-Feb;16(1):1-4.

Baum L, et al. Six-month randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, pilot clinical trial of curcumin in patients with Alzheimer disease. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008 Feb;28(1):110-3

Written By:

DEEPTIDeepti Rawat 

Trainee Medical Coder, Delhi 

 

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